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How to Improve Sleep to Work & Feel Better

What a difference a good night’s sleep can make, right? We work better, we feel better and consciously or not, we treat people better when we’re well-rested. True or true for you? In fact, the importance of sleep continues to be a hot topic. Nikken has been advocating for restful sleep with the help of advanced magnetic technology way before it became one of the primary focuses of Active Wellness practitioners!

Research tells us

Tell me, how important is sleep for your overall health? Let me share something with you. In a 2018 study, Mayo Clinic scientists found that sleep deprivation increases the likelihood of age-related memory loss.1 This follows a 2017 study that linked poor sleep to higher levels of other biological markers associated with age-related brain conditions.2 Another 2018 study even determined that one sleepless night alone can be damaging, leaving behind harmful protein debris in your brain.3

Lack of Sleep in numbers

The National Sleep Foundation’s (NSF) annual Sleep in America® poll shows Americans feel sleepy on average three times a week, with 62% trying to “shake it off” as their primary response. Those who feel sleepy five to seven days a week report especially high rates of irritability (52 per cent), headaches (40 per cent), and feeling unwell (34 per cent). The Sleep in America poll found when people feel sleepy, more Americans say it’s generally because they’re not sleeping well enough (55 per cent) as opposed to not having enough time to sleep (44 per cent).4

The right environment for sleep

To help achieve restful sleep, The National Sleep Foundation advises us to focus on maximizing comfort and minimizing distractions:

•            Use a high-performance mattress and pillow, such as the KenkoNaturest® Custom Pillow. This helps with comfort and the support of the spine to avoid achy muscles and joints.

My question for you: How has it been since you changed your last mattress? Is it time for a new one?

•            Choose quality sheets and blankets. Again, this is to help with comfort and maintenance of suitable temperatures throughout the night. The Kenko® Dream Comforter is ideal to snuggle under during cool nights.

My question for you: How long have you had your blankets and duvets?

•            Avoid light disruptions. Excess light exposure can throw off sleep and circadian rhythm. Use blackout curtains or a comfortable sleep mask, such as the Kenko PowerSleep Mask, to block out light.

My question for you: Do you have a digital clock, a TV set on standby, street lights coming in through your windows?

•            Keep noise to a minimum. If you can’t eliminate nearby sources of noise, consider drowning them out with a fan or white noise machine. Earplugs or headphones are another option to block abrasive sounds when you want to sleep.

My question for you: Is there actually noise that might be preventing your sleep?

•            Make sure the room temperature is not too hot or cold by using heaters, fans and air conditioning as necessary. Researchers have found that sleeping in a cooler environment of around 18 degrees Celsius or 65 degrees Fahrenheit is conducive to restful sleep.5

My question for you: Do you know the temperature in your bedroom? I bought recently a Gro EGG in my kid’s bedroom. It acts as a dim light at night. I know immediately what temperature the room has. I found it useful.

Further links to help you:

Does sleep matter to you?

Meditation to calm your busy mind

Yoga for sleep

Restful slumber tea before bed

1 D. Carvalho et al. Association of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness with Longitudinal Β-Amyloid Accumulation in Elderly Persons Without Dementia JAMA Neurology. Vol. 75, June 2018. doi: 10.1001/jamaneurol.2018.0049.
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/article-abstract/2674279

2 Sprecher KE et al. Poor sleep is associated with CSF biomarkers of amyloid pathology in cognitively normal adults. Neurology. 2017 Aug 1; 89(5): 445-453.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5539733/

3 Shokri-Kojori E et al. Β-Amyloid accumulation in the human brain after one night of sleep deprivation. PNAS April 24, 2018. 115 (17) 4483-4488;
http://www.pnas.org/content/115/17/4483

https://www.sleepfoundation.org/press-release/nsfs-2020-sleep-america-poll-shows-alarming-sleepiness-and-low-action

https://www.sleepfoundation.org/articles/healthy-sleep-tips

Helping You Create Healthier Life in 5 Areas

www.luciepatelvarekova.com

Skype: Lucie Patel Varekova

Email: [email protected]

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